Archive for the ‘Criminal Defense’ Category

Dallas County Criminal Defense Attorney Answers Questions Regarding Texas Felony Offenses

Monday, June 29th, 2015

If you or a loved one has been charged with a felony offense, you most likely have legal questions. The best source of information anytime a person has legal is questions is an experienced Dallas County attorney. If you are facing criminal charges, it is critical that you get the answers you need from a trusted source. A Texas felony is a serious offense and needs to be addressed promptly. The following are some of the most commonly asked questions that Dallas County residents have about felony offenses in Texas:

What are the different degrees of felony offenses?

In Texas, there are five different degrees of felony offenses. From least to most serious, the types and examples of each, are as follows:

  • State Jail: Theft of property between $1,500 and $20,000, forgery and possession of marijuana of more than 4 ounces but less than 5 lbs.
  • Third-degree: Possession of marijuana between 5 and 50lbs and third DWI conviction
  • Second-degree: Reckless injury to a child and property theft or insurance fraud between $100,000 and $200,000
  • First-degree: Arson which results in bodily injury or death and theft of property valued at more than $200,000
  • Capital: murder of a child under the age of 10

If convicted of a felony, what penalties would I face?  

Each category of felony offense carries with it a different maximum penalty. The maximum penalties for each type of felony are as follows:

State Jail: Fines of up to $10,000 and confinement between 180 days and two years in state jail

Third-degree: Fines of up to $10,000 and a prison term between 2 and 10 years

Second-degree: Fines of up to $10,000 and a prison term between 2 and 20 years

First-degree: Fines of up to $10,000 and a prison term of 5 to 99 years, or life in prison

Capital: Execution or life in prison without the possibility of parole

Is probation a possibility for a felony offense?

Yes, in certain circumstances a person charged with a felony can be granted probation. Probation is more likely if it would a first time conviction for the accused.

When can a person apply for parole?

For persons serving time in a state jail or prison, most often he or she can accrue an early release for good behavior. A good number of criminal offenses also allow a person to become eligible to apply for parole after the person has completed at least one fourth of his or her sentence.

If charged with a felony offense, why should I hire an attorney?

A felony conviction can have serious consequences. A person convicted of a felony can lose his or her voting rights, eligibility to hold a public office, and/or right to possess a firearm. A felony conviction can also cost a person his or her professional license and/or career. The best way to avoid a felony conviction on your record, is to seek the guidance of an experienced Texas criminal defense attorney.

If you have been arrested and charged with a non-violent felony offense in Dallas County, it is imperative that you speak with an experienced Criminal Defense Attorney as soon as possible. Only a seasoned Dallas County Criminal Defense Attorney can properly explain the charges against you and start to protect your rights. With more than 30 years of experience, Attorney Jack Pettit is the attorney you can trust when you have been charged with a criminal offense. To learn how Attorney Jack Pettit can assist you in your defense, contact the Law Office of Jack Pettit today to schedule an appointment by calling (214) 521-4567. Our office is conveniently located in downtown Dallas, across from the courthouse. We provide services to clients in both English and Spanish. Major credit cards are accepted as well.

 

Dallas County Attorney Answers the Most Frequently Asked Questions about Charges of Resisting and Evading Arrest

Thursday, June 11th, 2015

A person charged with resisting or evading arrest is usually facing serious criminal charges. First, he or she has the underlying charge and then, the additional charge of resisting or evading arrest. Although most people are familiar with the notion of “resisting arrest”, most are not clear on exactly what the crime entails. The following are some of the most frequently asked questions Dallas County residents have about resisting or evading arrest:

What does it mean to “resist arrest”?

According to the Texas Penal Code, a person can be charged with resisting arrest if he or she through the use of force, tries to prevent or obstruct a peace officer from making an arrest, or a search.

What sorts of actions constitute resisting arrest?

Since the definition of “resisting arrest” is quite broad, there are many actions that can result in a person being charged with the crime, including but not limited to, the following:

  • Physical fighting against an officer of the law when he or she attempts to place him or her in handcuffs;
  • Striking or pushing an officer of the law;
  • Struggling when an officer of the law attempts to place him or her in a police car or jail cell; and
  • Acting violently or threatening violence against an officer of the law (with or without the use of a weapon).

What penalties does a person charged with resisting arrest face?

In most instances of resisting arrest, the person will be charged with a Class A misdemeanor. The penalty for a Class A misdemeanor is a fine of up to $4,000 and up to one year in jail. However, if the person used a deadly weapon in his or her attempts to resist arrest, or in some way injures the arresting officer, he or she is most likely facing a Class C felony. A Class C felony is punishable by fines up to $10,000 and between two and ten years in prison.

Are there any defenses to a charge of resisting arrest?

Depending on the circumstances of the arrest, the person may have defenses to the charges. A good criminal defense attorney will examine the facts of an individual’s case to determine what defenses if any, he or she may have. The attorney will look to see if his or her client realize at the time of the arrest that the person arresting him or her, was in fact a peace officer. The attorney will also look to see if the peace officer used excessive force when making the arrest.

How is resisting arrest different from evading arrest?

A person evades arrest when he or she purposely takes off from a person he or she knows is an officer of the law, who is attempting to legally detain or arrest him or her. Most often evading arrest is a Class B misdemeanor, but if the person uses a motor vehicle in his or her attempts to flee, the person could be charged with a State Jail Felony. Also, if a person is killed when the person is trying to escape, the person could be charged with a 2nd degree felony.

If you have been arrested and charged with resisting arrest, it is important that you understand your rights. Only an experienced Dallas County Criminal Defense Attorney can review the charges against you and determine your best course of action. For more than 30 years Attorney Jack Pettit has provided aggressive representation for clients charged with both misdemeanor and felony criminal charges. As a former prosecutor, attorney Jack Pettit can provide you with the skilled legal representation you need when facing criminal charges. To schedule a free and confidential consultation contact the Law Office of Jack Pettit today at (214) 521-4567. Our office provides services to clients in both English and Spanish. Major credit cards are accepted as well.

 

Dallas County Criminal Defense Attorney Answers Questions about Driving on a Suspended, Invalid and/or Revoked License

Sunday, June 7th, 2015

There are many ways for a Texas motorist to lose his or her driving privileges. He or she may have racked up too many unpaid speeding tickets, or have had too many points assessed against his or her driver’s license. A motorist can also lose his or her license in connection with an alcohol related offense, such as DWI, or another criminal offense, like drag racing or using a fake id. Some drivers lose their driver’s license because they have been determined to be a “harm to others” by the court, due to a physical or mental impairment, or are chemically dependent.

When a motorist loses his or her license, he or she may have a “revoked”, “suspended” or “invalid” license. Since it can be quite difficult, if not nearly impossible to get around the great state of Texas without a driver’s license, many motorists that do not possess a valid license succumb to the temptation to drive. A driver who does not possess a valid license can be pulled over and arrested. The exact charge the driver will receive, will depend on the current status of his or her license. The following are the three most common charges a driver without a valid license can incur and how a Dallas County criminal defense attorney can help:

  • Driving on a suspended license: A person convicted of a DWI may have his or her license suspended for a specific amount of time, as part of his or her punishment. A person with a suspended license usually must satisfy a condition before he or she can request to have his or her license reinstated. In the case of a DWI, the driver may have to wait for the suspension time period to expire. However, in the meantime, the person may be eligible to apply for an occupational license.
  • Driving with an invalid license: A person with an invalid license, usually needs to do something in order to have his or license reinstated. Sometimes this can be as simple as paying fines or taking care of warrants for unpaid tickets. Once the hold is removed, the person can usually regain his or her license.
  • Driving on a revoked license: Unlike the above charges, a driver who has had his or her license revoked no longer has a valid license. There are several reasons why a driver may have his or her license revoked. One of the most common reasons, is if the person has a physical or mental impairment that renders him or her unable to operate a vehicle safely. For example, when a person loses his or her license due to advanced age, this is known as a “medical revocation.” If a person is charged with this crime, the best remedy is often for the person to resubmit an application for a valid driver’s license.

Driving without a valid license is a serious offense, and can range from a Class C to a Class A misdemeanor. While the maximum penalty for a Class C misdemeanor is only $500, a person convicted of a Class B misdemeanor can receive a fine of up to $2,000, and up to 180 days in jail. A qualified Dallas criminal defense attorney will not only help you fight the current charges, but can also help you to obtain a valid license, or an occupational license.

If you have been arrested and charged with driving on a suspended or invalid license, it is important that you speak with an experienced Dallas County Criminal Defense Attorney as soon as possible. To see how Attorney Jack Pettit can help resolve your legal woes, contact the Law Office of Jack Pettit today at (214) 521-4567 to schedule a free and confidential consultation. Our office provides services to clients in both English and Spanish. Major credit cards are accepted as well.

Dallas County Attorney Answers Some General Questions about Misdemeanor Offenses in Texas

Monday, March 30th, 2015

It is not uncommon for the average person to be unfamiliar with the Texas criminal justice system. Especially, if the person has never had a run in with the law or known someone who has. The following are some of the more general questions Dallas County residents have about misdemeanor offenses in Texas:

How do misdemeanor and felony offenses differ?

Generally speaking, offenses that are labeled as “misdemeanors” are considered to be far less serious crimes than those labeled as felony offenses. As such, misdemeanor offenses carry less serve penalties than felony offenses. For example, felony convictions are usually punishable by a sentence of at least one year in a state penitentiary and have stiff fines. Whereas misdemeanors sentences are usually for no more than one year and are served at the county jail. Some misdemeanor offenses carry no jail time and are only punishable by a fine. Unlike certain felony offenses, misdemeanor offenses also cannot not affect a person’s civil liberties. Therefore, a person charged with even a serious misdemeanor offense, will not lose his or her voting rights or right to own a firearm.

Are there different categories of misdemeanor offenses?

Just like felony offenses, they are varying degrees of misdemeanor offenses. The most serious of misdemeanor offenses, are categorized as Class A, and range to the least being Class C. Some examples of the misdemeanor offenses are as follows:

  • Class A: Carrying a gun without a permit, resisting arrest, and second offense DWI
  • Class B: Minor drug possession, vandalism, indecent exposure and first offense DWI
  • Class C: Possession of alcohol in a motor vehicle, public intoxication and disorderly conduct

What are the maximum penalties for a misdemeanor offense?  

Each category of misdemeanor carries with it a different maximum penalty. The penalties are as follows:

Class A: A fine not to exceed $4,000 and/or up to 365 days in jail

Class B: A fine not to exceed $2,000 and/or up to 180 days in jail

Class C: a fine of not more than $500

Does a person charged with a misdemeanor offense have the right to a trial by jury?

Just like with a felony offense, a person charged with a misdemeanor offense has the right to a jury trial. However, whether a person should exercise this right or not, is a decision best made after the person consults with his or her attorney.

Do I need to hire an attorney if charged with a misdemeanor?

While a person charged with a misdemeanor offense has the right to represent him or herself, it is often not a wise decision. While misdemeanor offenses carry less serve penalties than felony charges, the person’s rights are still in jeopardy. Depending on the charges faced, if found guilty the court could impose a sentence of up to a year in jail and the charge will appear on the person’s criminal record.

If you have been arrested and charged with a misdemeanor offense in Dallas County, it is normal to have questions and need someone to explain to you your rights. However, it is important that the only person you trust with providing you with such information is a seasoned Dallas County Criminal Defense Attorney. With more than 30 years of experience, Attorney Jack Pettit is the attorney you can turn to when you have been charged with a criminal offense. To learn how attorney Jack Pettit can help you, contact the Law Office of Jack Pettit today to schedule an appointment by calling (214) 521-4567. Our office is conveniently located in downtown Dallas, across from the courthouse. We provide services to clients in both English and Spanish. Major credit cards are accepted as well.

 

Dallas County Criminal Defense Attorney Answers the Most Frequently Asked Questions about Public Intoxication

Tuesday, March 3rd, 2015

It is not against the law to have a drink and walk up and down the streets of Dallas or any other Texas town for the matter. However, if you have a few too many drinks and trip and fall or become rowdy while out in public, you may have crossed the line between legal behavior and “public intoxication.” While public intoxication is not a serious offense in Texas, it can be quite embarrassing and have damaging outcomes. The following are some of the most frequently asked questions Dallas residents have about public intoxication:

What does it mean legally, to be publically intoxicated?

According to the Texas Penal Code, a person is considered to be publically intoxicated if he or she appears to be intoxicated to such a degree, that he or she poses a serious risk to him or herself or others.

What is considered a “public place”?

Texas law defines a public place as any location that is open to the public. This includes commonly thought of public places, like streets, sidewalks and parks. However, the definition of “public places” also includes, places like bars, clubs and restaurants. Even the common areas of apartment complexes, hotels and hospitals meet the law’s definition of “public places.”

What penalties can a person charged with public intoxication face?

A first time offense of public intoxication is considered to be a Class C misdemeanor. As such, a person who pleads guilty to this offense can face a maximum fine of up to $500. If a person charged with public intoxication has three or more prior convictions for the offense within the previous 24 months, he or she could be charged with a Class B misdemeanor. This more serious charge is punishable by a fine of up to $2,000 and/or up to 180 days in the local jail.

Are DWI and public intoxication different?

Public intoxication and driving while intoxicated are completely separate offenses. If a person is charged with DWI and the prosecutor is unable to prove its case against the person, the charges cannot be reduced to ‘public intoxication.’

Should I hire an attorney if I am charged with public intoxication?

Unfortunately, often people who are charged with public intoxication think that there is no point in hiring an attorney to challenge the charges because they face no jail time and the fine is minimal. But, while the offense may only be a misdemeanor, it can pose some serious consequences. If found guilty, the charge will appear on the person’s criminal record. Which means that a person may have to disclose the offense to potential employers on job applications, on forms to receive government or financial assistance, and even to college or universities on admissions applications. In choosing to hire an experienced criminal defense attorney, the attorney will not only fight to protect your rights, he or she will also work to keep your criminal record clear.

If you have been arrested and charged public intoxication it is important that you understand your rights. Only an experienced Dallas County Criminal Defense Attorney can review the charges against you and determine your best course of action. For more than 30 years Attorney Jack Pettit has provided aggressive representation for clients charged with both misdemeanor and felony criminal charges. As a former prosecutor, attorney Jack Pettit can provide you with the superior legal representation you need when facing criminal charges. To schedule a free and confidential consultation contact the Law Offices of Jack Pettit today at (214) 521-4567. Our office provides services to clients in both English and Spanish. Major credit cards are accepted as well.

What a Dallas County Criminal Defense Attorney Wants You to Know about Class C Misdemeanors

Sunday, March 1st, 2015

In Texas, the least serious category of criminal offenses are known as Class C misdemeanor offenses.  While Class C misdemeanors carry the least possible amount of punishment of any criminal offense, the charges should not be taken lightly. All too often persons charged with Class C misdemeanors treat them more like mere traffic violations, than like criminal charges. Not taking a criminal charge seriously can be a big mistake and one that can have a detrimental impact on a person’s life.  Crimes that are classified as Class C misdemeanors, include the following offenses:

  • Assault
  • Bail jumping
  • Criminal trespass
  • Disorderly conduct
  • Gambling
  • Leaving a child unattended in a vehicle
  • Minor in possession of drugs, alcohol or tobacco
  • Minors driving under the influence
  • Operating a motor vehicle with an open container
  • Shoplifting
  • Writing bad checks

If you have been charged with a Class C misdemeanor, there are several things you need to know, before you decide to simply pay the fine:

  • Paying the fine is not your only option. When charged with a Class C misdemeanor, paying the fine is not your only option. In fact you may even have defenses to the charge, which could lead to a dismissal of the charges or a finding of not guilty. But you will never know if you could have beaten the charges, if you do not consult with a criminal defense attorney.
  • A conviction means a criminal record. Whether you simply pay the fine or are found guilty, a conviction of even a Class C misdemeanor offense means that you now have a criminal record. Having a criminal record can impact a person in many different ways. Certain employers will not hire a person with a criminal record, which cost a person his or her job or potential job prospects. A person with a criminal record may also find it difficult to obtain admission into certain college or vocational programs. Once on your record, a criminal conviction can stay there forever.
  • Hiring a local experienced criminal defense attorney can make a big difference. Anytime you are charged with a criminal offense, your rights and future are at stake. The difference between representing yourself pro se (or even hiring just any attorney) and hiring a local experienced criminal defense attorney can be the difference between acquiring a criminal record and walking away without a record. To make sure you receive the best possible representation, you want to hire an attorney that not only has vast experience handling misdemeanor charges, but who is also familiar with the local rules and courtroom procedures.
  • You may be eligible to file for an expunction. Certain Class C misdemeanor charges can be expunged from a person’s record. This means that the arrest and/or the conviction will not appear on the person’s criminal record. An experienced criminal defense attorney can determine if your record can be expunged.

 If you have been arrested and charged with a Class C misdemeanor it is important that you speak with an experienced Dallas County Criminal Defense Attorney as soon as possible. While a Class C misdemeanor is the least serious category of criminal offenses, a conviction still means a blemish on your criminal record. For more than 30 years Attorney Jack Pettit has worked diligently to protect the rights of clients charged with both misdemeanor and felony offenses. As a former prosecutor, Jack Pettit brings a special level of experience to his clients. Call the Law Office of Jack Pettit today at (214) 521-4567 to schedule a free and confidential consultation. Our office provides services to clients in both English and Spanish. Major credit cards are accepted as well.

Dallas County Criminal Attorney Discusses the 2015 Great Texas Warrant Roundup

Saturday, February 14th, 2015

If you have not yet heard, the Great Texas Warrant Roundup is about to begin. For those familiar with the event, 2014 was one of the largest warrant enforcement efforts in the nation, with more than 300 Texas jurisdictions participating. In 2014, more than 130,000 warrants were cleared and more than $20 million dollars gross was collected. If you are not familiar with this event, you probably have many questions. With this in mind, the following are the most often asked questions about the Great Texas Warrant Roundup:

What is the 2015 Great Texas Warrant Roundup?

The Great Texas Warrant Roundup (“Warrant Roundup”) is a state wide effort to clear outstanding warrants. This year, law enforcement agencies from more than 300 jurisdictions have already agreed to participate. Individuals that will be targeted during the Warrant Roundup will be those with city ordinance, parking, penal code, traffic and higher charge warrants.

When does the 2015 Warrant Roundup begin?

The 2015 Warrant Roundup begins Saturday, March 7, 2015. However, hundreds of thousands of notices were mailed in mid-February to individuals who have outstanding warrants. Those individuals are being encouraged by law enforcement agencies to voluntarily dispose of their cases prior to the start of the roundup.

If I received a notice or believe I have a warrant out for my arrest, what should I do?

The best thing to do is to seek the advice of experienced traffic or criminal attorney. A skilled traffic or criminal attorney can help you determine what actions need to be taken to address the warrant. He or she can help dispose of the warrant and try to decrease the penalties you may be facing, which may include reducing possible fines.

What may happen if I do not resolve my warrant before the Warrant Roundup begins?  

The purpose of the Warrant Roundup is to target those individuals who have not resolved their outstanding warrants. If you do not resolve your warrant prior to the start of the Warrant Roundup then you risk being arrested. Local agencies will be aggressively trying to clear up their list of outstanding warrants during this year’s Warrant Roundup. Individuals with outstanding warrants can be arrested virtually anytime and anywhere. This means if you have a warrant you could be arrested at home, while driving, at school or even at work. That is why it is better to resolve your warrant before the Warrant Round begins or risk the inconvenience and possible embarrassment of being arrested.

Is it too late to hire an attorney to represent me on my warrant?

No. It most cases it is not too late. However, you will be in a much better position if you seek the assistance of an attorney before you are arrested. Therefore, if you have a warrant out it is best to meet with an attorney as soon as possible or at least by March 6, 2015. This does not mean that an attorney cannot help you if you are arrested after the Warrant Roundup begins. It just means your case may be more difficult.

If you have a warrant out for your arrest in Dallas County or another county in Texas, you will want to contact a Dallas County Criminal Attorney as soon as possible. With more than 30 years of experience, Dallas County Criminal Attorney Jack Pettit can help take care of your warrant before you are arrested. To find out how Mr. Pettit can help you with your warrant, contact our office today by calling (214) 521-4567. The office is conveniently located in downtown Dallas, across from the courthouse. We provide services to clients in both English and Spanish. Major credit cards are accepted as well.

Texas Criminal Defense Lawyer Reports: Texas Lawmakers Want to Ban “Affluenza” Defense

Monday, December 15th, 2014

In mid-December of 2013, a Fort Worth Juvenile Court Judge sentenced a 16-year old boy to 10 years probation for intoxication-induced manslaughter. According to testimony and surveillance video, the teen and his friends stole two cases of beer from a store. Later that day, the teen was speeding and slammed into four pedestrians, killing them all. At the time of accident, the teen’s blood alcohol level was found to be three times the legal limit. Two of the seven of passengers who were riding in the bed of the teen’s pickup were also seriously injured. One suffered a brain injury and today, cannot move or talk.

At the sentencing hearing, attorneys for the teen presented what is being referred to as the “affluenza” defense. The court heard testimony from a psychologist, serving as an expert witness for the teen, that the teen suffered from “affluenza” by being reared in a very wealthy household with two parents who were engrossed with arguments, which led to their eventual divorce. The psychologist described the teen’s father as not having relationships and his mother as being oerly indulgent. The two never set limits for their son. According to the attorneys for the teen, the Judge specifically stated that she did not base her sentencing decision on the “affluenza” defense. While that may be true, the victims’ families and the prosecutors were disappointed with the Judge’s sentence.

Prosecutors had asked the Judge to sentence the teen to twenty years behind bars. With the Judge’s current ruling the teen will not serve any time in jail. Rather he will attend a treatment facility, the cost of which will exceed $450,000 per year. The teen’s parents were ordered to pay for the cost of the treatment. It is uncertain how long the teen will have to stay at the treatment center. Some of the victims’ families expressed that they thought the teen’s family’s wealth helped him get out of serving jail time.

The victims’ families and the prosecutors are not the only people unhappy with the outcome of this case. Now, several Texas lawmakers want to ban the so called “affluenza” defense. In November, James White, a Southeast Texas state representative, presented a bill that would essentially prohibit an individual from discussing his or her “affluent circumstances” during sentencing. White proposed the bill because he thinks the affluenza defense has added to people’s lack of trust in the justice system. White points to the inherent unfairness in a judge or jury being able to take into consideration an individual’s affluent circumstances as the basis for committing a crime—a defense that would not be available to the less fortunate.

Critics of the defense also include an attorney who represented several defendants in civil cases against the teen. She opined that teen’s attorneys were creative with a made-up defense. She went on to say that the defense has no scientific backing and should not have been allowed to be presented at the sentence hearing.

Since White filed his bill, two other legislators have submitted their own similar bills. What will happen to the bills as of now remains unseen. The new session of the legislature begins in January 2015.

If you have been arrested and charged with drunk driving, the first thing you need to do is to make an appointment to meet with an experienced Texas Criminal Defense Lawyer. A skilled DWI Defense Attorney will explain your rights and review your legal options with you. Attorney Jack Pettit, has represented countless persons charged with DWI. As a former prosecutor, Jack Pettit knows what it takes to fight a charge of DWI and win. Call the Law Offices of Jack Pettit today at (214) 521-4567 to schedule a free and completely confidential consultation. Our office provides services to clients in both English and Spanish. Major credit cards are accepted as well.

What a Charge of Disorderly Conduct Means in Texas

Sunday, October 26th, 2014

Disorderly conduct is broad term that refers to a variety of crimes that offend, scare or endanger the community at large. These crimes are often thought of as things that people do when they are under the influence of drugs or alcohol, like urinating in a public place. However, while some of these crimes do occur when a person’s judgment is impaired by a substance, others do not. Sometimes, a person charged with disorderly conduct is not even aware that he or she at the time was breaking the law. However, it is important to remember that ignorance is never a valid defense. This is especially important for parents to understand, because children who are older than sixth grade can be charged in Texas with disorderly conduct. The following are a list of some of the acts that can result in a disorderly conduct charge:

  • Public displaying one’s private parts without regard to whether the act may offend or upset other people (i.e., “flashing” someone);
  • Fighting in public;
  • Publicly firing a weapon for a reason other than to protect yourself or others from a dangerous animal;
  • Publicly brandishing a weapon for the purposes of scaring or upsetting other people;
  • Use of obscene or offensive language that is intended to scare or provoke other people (i.e., using “fighting words”);
  • Publicly fighting;
  • Creating excessive noise that disturbs other or the community at large;
  • Being a “peeping Tom,” or peering into another’s person’s private residence or at a person in a public shower or restroom for purposes that are not lawful;
  • Picketing a funeral;
  • Participation in a riot;
  • Being obviously drunk while in public or public intoxication;
  • Blocking a sidewalk, street or access to public building, “protesting” that results in blocking a public road; and
  • Making a false or harassing 911 call.

Punishment

The punishment for a charge of disorderly conduct depends on the severity of the charge. For example, fighting in public in most instances will be considered to be a Class C misdemeanor, which is the least serious misdemeanor. A Class C misdemeanor is punishable by a $500 fine. Funeral picketing and rioting are examples of acts usually classified as Class B misdemeanors. The punishment for a Class B misdemeanor is a fine of up to $2,000 and/or jail time of up to 180 days. However, either of these crimes can be upgraded to a Class A misdemeanor if the crime warrants it.

Seek the advice of an attorney

Any time a person is arrested and charged with a crime, regardless if the crime is a petty offense or a serious charge, his or her rights are in jeopardy. A seasoned criminal defense attorney will be able to not only protect your rights, but also determine if you have any defenses to the charges. A person who forgoes representation and just accepts the charges will have a criminal record. A criminal record is not something that disappears overnight. In many instances, a criminal record can interfere with a person’s ability to obtain employment or can even raise your insurance rates.

If you have been arrested and charged disorderly conducts or disturbing the peace, it is important that you speak with an experienced Dallas County Criminal Defense Attorney as soon as possible. For more than 30 years Attorney Jack Pettit has provided aggressive representation for clients charged with both misdemeanor and felony criminal charges. As a former prosecutor, Jack Pettit brings a special advantage to his clients. To schedule a free and confidential consultation call the Law Offices of Jack Pettit today at (214) 521-4567. Our office provides services to clients in both English and Spanish. Major credit cards are accepted as well.

Dallas County – How to Locate an Arrested Individual

Friday, September 12th, 2014

Dallas County is rather large compared to other metropolitan areas, so arrested individuals may be difficult to find.  While it is possible to use the Dallas County website’s jail lookup system to locate a particular individual, it still may be difficult to make contact with the individual you are looking for.  Further, not everyone has access to the internet or may know where to go to find out information on a loved one’s whereabouts.  There are multiple police stations in Dallas County, and it is often too burdensome for people to go to each police station in search of someone.  In order to determine if someone you know has been arrested and is in need of legal representation, you should consider contacting a Dallas County Criminal Defense Attorney yourself as soon as you become aware that your friend or family member may have been arrested.

Finding an Arrested Individual in Dallas County

If you are able to find a family member or friend by searching Dallas County’s jail lookup, then you can go to that particular jail to find out more information on this individual.  If you do not have the means of locating a family member or friend who may be in jail, then you should consult with an attorney who has the resources to find your loved one.  Even if you are able to find your loved one in a particular Dallas County jail, you will still need the guidance of an attorney to help your loved one receive the legal representation he or she deserves.  It is important to note that some individuals may simply be absent from the Dallas County jail lookup, even if they are in fact in a Dallas County jail. Because of this possibility, it is important to have an attorney standing by to help you located your family member or friend.

Finding the Right Dallas County Attorney to Help You

When looking for an attorney who will help you find your family member or friend, you should look for an attorney who has the experience and skill needed to provide your family member or friend with superior legal representation.  While being arrested does not always result in criminal charges, it is crucial that an attorney be able to meet with an arrested individual as soon as possible.  Without the help of an attorney, some people have no choice but to remain in jail, unaware of what the future may bring.  As such, the best step you can take when trying to locate someone you believe may be in jail, is to contact a qualified Dallas County Criminal Defense Attorney who has the qualifications and track record of success.

Contact Dallas Criminal Defense Attorney Jack Pettit Today to Schedule an Initial Consultation

It isn’t always easy to find a friend or family member who has been arrested, especially given the large size of Dallas County.  While you may be able to find information by calling a police station or searching online, these efforts may prove to be fruitless.  If you are concerned about someone you know, and believe he or she has been arrested, it is important that you consider how a skilled Dallas County Criminal Defense Attorney can help you and your friend or family member.  As a former prosecutor, Dallas Criminal Defense Attorney Jack Pettit has more than thirty years of experience both prosecuting and defending criminal charges.  With his knowledge, skill and dedication, Mr. Pettit provides his clients with the best legal representation possible given the individual circumstances of each client’s case.  If you would like to speak with Jack Pettit about a criminal matter, contact our office today to schedule an initial consultation by calling (214) 521-4567.  Our office conveniently provides bilingual legal services in both English and Spanish, and we also accept major credit cards.